Browse Items (495 total)

In 1885, Charles McClung McGhee established the Lawson McGhee Library as a memorial to his daughter, May Lawson McGhee Williams. The original building on the corner of Gay and Vine was replaced by this white marble structure on the corner of Market…

The Union Army built Knoxville's first bridge across the Tennessee River during the Civil War. This structure was washed away in 1867 and subsequently replaced by a toll bridge. A tornado destroyed this span in 1875, and a fourth bridge was…

View of the Cherokee Country Club's original clubhouse, constructed in 1907. The structure was demolished in 1928 to make way for a more elaborate clubhouse designed by Knoxville architects Baumann and Baumann.

The Medical Arts Building, located on Knoxville's Main Street, was completed in 1930. It was constructed under the direct supervision of the medical profession so that it could be tailored to meet the individual needs of each tenant. For many years,…

In 1943, a group of East Tennessee Baptists conceived of building a Baptist Hospital in Knoxville to alleviate a pronounced shortage of available hospital beds in that city. The East Tennessee Baptist Hospital was completed in 1948 at a cost of…

Aerial view of Knoxville, Tennessee showing part of the University of Tennessee campus (including Hoskins Library and Ayres Hall), the Henley Street Bridge, and East Tennessee Baptist Hospital.

Ralph Lawson Berry founded the Ralph L. Berry Funeral Home on September 20, 1928. His son, Fred O. Berry Sr., joined him in the business in 1934, but problems among the stockholders forced both to resign in 1936. In 1937, Ralph Berry, Fred Berry, and…

In early 1892, W.W. Woodruff offered his lot on Deaderick Street and his help raising funds to Knoxville's First Baptist Church in order to organize a new church. The product of these efforts was Centennial Baptist Church (renamed Deaderick Avenue…

The Union Army built Knoxville's first bridge across the Tennessee River during the Civil War. This structure was washed away in 1867 and subsequently replaced by a toll bridge. A tornado destroyed this span in 1875, and a fourth bridge was…

Clay Brown Atkin (1864-1931) owned the Hotel Atkin, originally built by his father in the late 1870s on Knoxville's Gay Street. Atkin also ran a business manufacturing furniture and mantels, developed a number of other Knoxville and Fountain City…

The East Tennessee Hospital for the Insane opened in 1886 with 99 patients transferred from the older Tennessee Lunatic Asylum in Nashville. In 1920, the facility's name was changed to Eastern State Hospital as part of a program to rename all of the…

The 1910 Appalachian Exposition was held from September 12 to October 12 in Knoxville's Chilhowee Park. The first of its kind in Appalachia, the Fair was intended to demonstrate Southern progress in industry and commerce and to advocate the…

View down Knoxville's Hill Avenue. Visible are an unidentified cross street and private residence.

The first Methodist Episcopal Church was organized shortly after the Civil War by the Reverend J.B. Ford. Their first permanent church, dedicated in 1869, stood on the corner of Clinch and Market Streets. The congregation grew quickly and moved to…

Until the Louisville & Nashville Railroad gained entrance to Knoxville in 1905, the Southern Railway held a monopoly on rail traffic through the city. This depot was completed in 1906 and featured such amenities as a Ladies' Waiting Room with a…

Perez Dickinson was born in Amherst, Massachusetts in 1813. He moved to Knoxville in about 1830, where he quickly became an extremely popular and successful merchant. He purchased Williams Island (located in the Tennessee River) in 1869. Here, he…

Melrose Park was originally an upscale Knoxville residential neighborhood. The University of Tennessee acquired the area in the 1960s and began destroying its Victorian-era homes to allow for University expansion in the late 1970s. Although several…

Lewis M.G. Baker and Charles M. Himel established this private school, located on the corner of Highland and 12th Streets, in 1889. It was dedicated to preparing boys for college, and for many years the University of Tennessee and several other…

Completed in 1874, Knoxville's Post Office and Custom House may have been the city's first building to be designed by a professional architect, in this case Alfred B. Mullett. The structure was enlarged in 1910 and operated until a new Post Office…

Completed in 1874, Knoxville's Post Office and Custom House may have been the city's first building to be designed by a professional architect, in this case Alfred B. Mullett. The structure was enlarged in 1910 and operated until a new Post Office…

Completed in 1874, Knoxville's Post Office and Custom House may have been the city's first building to be designed by a professional architect, in this case Alfred B. Mullett. The structure was enlarged in 1910 and operated until a new Post Office…

In 1885, Charles McClung McGhee established the Lawson McGhee Library as a memorial to his daughter, May Lawson McGhee Williams. The original building on the corner of Gay and Vine was replaced by this white marble structure on the corner of Market…

In 1885, Charles McClung McGhee established the Lawson McGhee Library as a memorial to his daughter, May Lawson McGhee Williams. The original building on the corner of Gay and Vine was replaced by this white marble structure on the corner of Market…

The 1910 Appalachian Exposition was held from September 12 to October 12 in Knoxville's Chilhowee Park. The first of its kind in Appalachia, the Fair was intended to demonstrate Southern progress in industry and commerce and to advocate the…

The Machinery and Liberal Arts Building was constructed in Chilhowee Park as part of the 1913 National Conservation Exposition. Although this event dealt only with local issues, it was an ambitious attempt to educate citizens and businessmen about…

View of the L.A. Ault home. A number of families bearing the Ault surname lived in the Knoxville area during the early part of the 20th century, but unfortunately it is impossible to tell which group this postcard's author belongs to.

Park City High School was built in 1907. For a brief time, it was the largest high school in Knoxville. It later became Park Lowry Grammar School and was closed in 1982. The building was sold to private contractors in the mid 1980s, but was…

Park City High School was built in 1907. For a brief time, it was the largest high school in Knoxville. It later became Park Lowry Grammar School and was closed in 1982. The building was sold to private contractors in the mid 1980s, but was…

The Union Army built Knoxville's first bridge across the Tennessee River during the Civil War. This structure was washed away in 1867 and subsequently replaced by a toll bridge. A tornado destroyed this span in 1875, and a fourth bridge was…

Originally known as Lake Ottossee, Chilhowee Park began to develop as a recreational area in 1890 when William G. McAdoo opened a streetcar line making the lake easily accessible from Knoxville. The area was renamed Chilhowee Park in 1900 and was the…

View of the Tennessee River from Paint Rock. "Paint Rock" likely refers to the Paint Rock River, which is a small tributary that joins the Tennessee River near the Tennessee/Alabama border.

When the Church Street Methodist Episcopal Church South building (constructed in 1875) was destroyed by fire in 1928, the structure shown replaced it. Although the new building stood at the corner of Henley and Main Streets, the congregation chose to…

View of the Tennessee River where it passes through downtown Knoxville. This particular image also shows the Gay Street Bridge, the Baptist Hospital, and several of Knoxville's taller buildings.

View of the Knoxville & Augusta (later Southern) Railroad bridge, the fourth Gay Street Bridge, and the Knoxville, Cumberland Gap & Louisville Railroad bridge. This picture was taken from near the foot of the University of Tennessee's "Hill" and…

The first Grand Army of the Republic monument was erected in the northeast corner of Knoxville's National Cemetery in 1901. This memorial featured a column of Tennessee marble topped by a statue of a Union soldier and a bronze eagle with his wings…

St. John's Episcopal Church was organized in Knoxville in 1826. Its original house of worship (on the corner of Walnut and Cumberland streets) was razed in 1891 in order to make way for a larger structure. This building, designed by J.W. Yost, was…

View of downtown Knoxville showing the World's Fair Park (including the Sunsphere and the State of Tennessee Amphitheater), the Hilton and Marriott Hotels, Riverside Towers, and a number of other prominent buildings.

When the Church Street Methodist Episcopal Church South building (constructed in 1875) was destroyed by fire in 1928, the structure shown replaced it. Although the new building stood at the corner of Henley and Main Streets, the congregation chose to…

Melrose Park was originally an upscale Knoxville residential neighborhood. The University of Tennessee acquired the area in the 1960s and began destroying its Victorian-era homes to allow for University expansion in the late 1970s. Although several…

View of the interior of G.W. Carden's confectionary located at 315 Gay Street. Like many of its contemporaries, this establishment featured a soda fountain, tables, and a candy shop.